Serrapeptase Special Offer
Your Basket
Your basket is empty
A
B
C
D
F
G
I
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
V
W
Z


Rainbow Savings Club
  • Free Gift with orders over £25
  • Free to Join
  • Save 10% on all subsequent orders
  • The Best Supplement Offers direct to your Inbox
Phone Orders
Call us now on 0845 643 1780 to order
Please note, due to our low prices, there is a £3 surcharge for phone orders.
£10.75
Add to Basket £11.38  - save £0.63
Includes UK P&P
Change currency:

Glucosamine Sulphate Tablets

  • Info
  • Ingredients
  • Directions
  • Useful Articles

360 x 1000mg Tablets (Family Pack)

Glucosamine Sulphate is the amino sugar of glucose bound to sulphur (glycosaminoglycan) a compound which occurs naturally in the joints. Its main function is to stimulate the growth of cartilage. In many people, the production of GS in the body declines with age and cartilage loses its flexibility as a shock absorber. When taking Glucosamine Sulphate, 98% is absorbed into the body and once absorbed, it is incorporated into the chrondroitin sulphate molecule and distributed primarily to the joint tissues.

Glucosamine is obtained by hydrolosis of crustacean shells, quitin or decalcified crustacean shells. It is isolated in crystalline form as the salt of glucosamine and hydrochloric acid, or transferred into the sulphate form.

Other applications:
It is also described as a potential therapeutic product in wound healing and gastrointestinal disorders. Some evidence suggests that it may be clinically useful in inflammatory bowel disorders. The proposed explanation is that supplemental glucosamine increases production of heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycans by the vascular endothelium, thereby improving the endothelium's barrier function.

Each tablet provides 1000mg of Glucosamine Sulphate
Take 1-2 tablets a day with food

You may find the following articles useful::

Glucosamine - Relief for your Aching Joints
Glucosamine is a natural, non toxic compound found in the body. It is an amino sugar and a prominent precursor in the biochemical synthesis of glycosy